The US Returns To Superstition

  • Date: 05/11/12
  • Steven Goddard, Real Science

Climate news is dominated by superstition rather than science. Not a recipe for societal success. Bad weather has always happened, and pretending that we can do something about it is as stupid as humans get.

One Sunday afternoon in 1969 the filthy, oil-coated Cuyahoga River in Ohio caught fire and quickly became a potent symbol of industrial pollution, helping galvanize public opinion and set the stage for passage of national environmental laws the following decade.

The combination of Hurricane Sandy and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s announcement that he was endorsing President Obama largely because of Obama’s actions on global warming could do the same thing for climate change, say scientists and political observers.

“This may be that sort of Cuyahoga River moment for climate change,” said Michael Mann, a leading climate scientist and Penn State University professor. “It has galvanized attention to this issue and the role that climate change may be playing with regard to the intensification of extreme weather.”

Coming on the heels of this summer’s crop-withering drought in the Midwest and destructive wildfires in the West, Sandy provided a glimpse of what scientists say the nation can expect with global warming.

Sandy a galvanizing moment for climate change? – latimes.com

This has nothing to do with science, and everything to do with superstition. Historical records show that none of the issues described above are either unusual, or getting worse.

The US had the fewest fires in over 20 years.

National Interagency Fire Center
National Interagency Fire Center

The US is experiencing the longest period without a major hurricane strike since the Civil War.

www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/hurdat/ushurrlist18512009.txt

The US is getting wetter, with fewer droughts.

Contiguous U.S., Palmer Modified Drought Index (PMDI), August-July 1896-2012

Climate news is dominated by superstition rather than science. Not a recipe for societal success. Bad weather has always happened, and pretending that we can do something about it is as stupid as humans get.

Real Science, 5 November 2012